100+ Reasons of App Rejection for AppStore;

Posted on Updated on

What !!! Rejected ?? but why ??? oh Damn it …

After a tiring days and sleepless nights, busy weekends and thoughtful breaks, getting rejection from AppStore is worst; No one wants to see a red label, against his/her app over itunes, saying rejected; There could be many reasons, really they are MANY, 100 plus, and any single of them can ruined your efforts and excitement within a second;

No doubt we all take care of some common points that may lead to app rejection, like purchase transaction out side the Apple’s platform, icon/splash image with proper dimensions etc, but again there are many others too that can be surly neglected without going through the list of possible rejection reasons; Before approaching to AppStore, one responsible authority from development squad (your QA guy, technical lead) should carefully revise each aspect that can stop your app to reach millons of iOS users;

Apple has a brief public guidelins for AppStore review; They have divided it into many different categories, making it easy to revise the functionality of your app with every possible angle; They includes

  • Terms and conditions
  • Functionality
  • Metadata, ratings and rankings
  • Location
  • Push notifications
  • Game Center
  • iAds
  • Trademarks and trade dress
  • Media content
  • User interface
  • Purchasing and currencies
  • Scraping and aggregation
  • Damage to device
  • Personal attacks
  • Violence
  • Objectionable content
  • Privacy
  • Pornography
  • Religion, culture, and ethnicity
  • Contests, sweepstakes, lotteries, and raffles
  • Charities and contributions
  • Legal requirements

You can find them at App Store Review Guidelines – App Store Resource Center. One common term .i.e. will be rejected is used in the  guidelines this much times that at a certain point, you (like me) will start feeling that they are not ready to approve your app at any cost; 😀

The total of all clause for all categories is more then 100; 🙂 So have a reasonable time slot for guidelines review activity, while scheduling your project;

free counters

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “100+ Reasons of App Rejection for AppStore;

    atharjatoi said:
    May 2, 2012 at 11:17

    I am looking to develop a iOS app, and need to consult you if you are willing please email me.

    Athar

      Ans responded:
      May 20, 2012 at 21:45

      sure, you can contact me anytime over my email and/or cell number;

    Jason said:
    August 9, 2012 at 07:34

    We submitted an IOS app and received a rejection. The rejection letter was 3 pages long about how we need to add Safarii integration, and other apple related content to the app, then were told to make the make the app run faster. The entire rejection letter was an automatic response, that had ZERO relevancy and littered with contradicting statements like the one above.

    I’ve spent 3 months arguing with them in their online submission system. No one can call me and give specific reason why they rejected my app, they just keep sending me a response to appeal, which I have done 10 times now and continue to get the same 3 page, most non-specific letter again and again.

    The app is a template that several other business just like ourselves have submitted and received acceptance. The app works for specific geographical locations. The funny part is all those apps have great reviews…

    Oh and don’t get me started on the Dev account set-up process, because of one small type error on the city business license they left a C off LLC. We have spent combined over 6 months with apple.

    Unfortunately I can’t push my dates out anymore, as of Aug 24 our business would have pissed away the last bit of its money on a non-refundable marketing campaign that highlights this app, that as of now is still in rejection.

    See my dilemma is simple, they can’t tell me what exactly needs to be changed and the developers won’t make changes as long as 30 other apps of the exact same template remain available on the market place.

      Ans responded:
      August 13, 2012 at 20:39

      This is really strange behavior from Apple; Me too got some rejections from Apple and they didn’t clearly describe what is the actual reason for rejection; Sometime they are really descriptive but many times they leave you in dark space; The resolution center and technical team also looks no-help board;

    Jason said:
    August 9, 2012 at 07:40

    Here is the rejection letter, and here is the template of our app, http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/919-dine/id413762082?mt=8

    Ohh and have the links the they provided in their rejection letter are broken.

    Hi Jason,

    Thank you for submitting an appeal to the App Review Board for your app, Lightning Delivery.

    We have considered your appeal and have determined that the review findings of 7/24/2012 are still appropriate since the user interface of your app doesn’t meet expectations.

    Apple and Apple customers place a high value on design and expect apps to provide a really great user experience. Apps should provide valuable utility or entertainment, draw people in with an attractive and well-organized UI, keep people engaged by offering compelling capabilities or content, and enable people to do something they couldn’t do before or in a way they couldn’t do it before.

    Apps should do one thing really well without being overly simplistic and missing functionality that people would expect to be there. They should also avoid being so complicated that people are confused about what the app does and how to use it. They should meet people’s expectations and have features that are easy to identify and use.

    Apps should be fast and responsive. They should launch quickly, scroll information smoothly, load screens and content without delay, and immediately respond to pinches and swipes and other gestures.

    They should integrate well with iOS and other apps. For example, they should allow text selection and other relevant content to be shared with other apps or people. They should initiate a phone call, launch a web page in Safari, or view a street address in Maps when a phone number, URL, or address is tapped. Where appropriate, and with the users’ permission, apps should use personal information stored on the device such as contacts and photos.

    To help you gain a better understanding of iOS user interface design we recommend:

    1) Looking closely at apps such as Safari, Mail, Stocks, Weather, Photos, Messages, Calendar, Maps, Music, and Settings. These Apple apps demonstrate many of the concepts outlined above and are great examples of how to organize information, display content, and navigate through screens.

    2) Watch the iOS Development Videos . These videos are of sessions presented by Technology Evangelists at recent iOS Tech Talks and provide lots of programming and design tips.

    3) Watch the video “The Ingredients of Great Apps” which uses some award winning apps on the App Store as examples of how to make a great app

    4) Watch the video “iPhone and iPad User Interface Design” for practical design tips you can use right away

    5) Carefully read the iOS Human Interface Guidelines and double check that your app’s user interface adheres to these valuable guidelines.

    6) Read the App Design Basics section of the iOS App Programming Guide.

    It takes time and effort to create well-designed iOS app, but the benefits are worth it. Well-designed apps are used day after day instead of being ignored or deleted, they’re talked about and gifted by people, they chart higher in the App Store, they’re more popular, and they receive higher ratings and better reviews.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s